KGH Interpretation Spanish-English Medical & Mental Health Interpretation

AALB Trainer Resources

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Hey there fellow AALB trainer! I created this page because I’ve had a few of you asking me if you could use resources from my YouTube channel, website, or from other classes in your classes. The answer is a resounding YES so long as you aren’t directly selling my materials for profit. I really just want students to get the most out of our classes to empower them to be the best interpreters they can be.

Programs I Use

Powerpoint

I often get asked 1) what program I use to design my presentations and 2) where I get my templates. I’m just used to Powerpoint after having used it for years and I usually just tweak the templates that you can search when creating a new presentation document. Yes, it really is that simple, I swear ๐Ÿ˜‰ I just used to be a web/graphic designer so I tinker around a lot until it looks the way I want it to.

OBS (Screen-Sharing)

Whenever I present in Zoom I use OBS (Open Broadcaster Software) instead of just sharing my PowerPoint window. I do this by starting the OBS virtual camera, and then in Zoom going to “Share Screen,” selecting “Advanced Options,” and selecting “Second Camera” (it looks like an old-school document projector). I do this because I find switching shares in Zoom to be time-consuming and obtrusive. Additionally with OBS I can share different windows (including a restricted view of my browser), images, and a second video camera if I so choose (would be SUPER useful for the note-taking classes!).

Stuff I Use to ๐ŸŒถ๏ธ Spice Up ๐ŸŒถ๏ธ Google Classroom

Emojipedia

A plain blob of text in Google Classroom doesn’t really call students’ attention, and there may be certain materials or links you’d like to have stand out. Emojis have become an integral part of our daily lexicon! I also use this in my Google Forms when I do quizzes to make divisions more apparent because formatting options there too are limited.

ASCII Text Generator

๐’ฒ๐‘œ๐“Š๐“๐’น ๐“Ž๐‘œ๐“Š ๐“๐’พ๐“€๐‘’ ๐“‰๐‘’๐“๐“‰ ๐“๐’พ๐“€๐‘’ ๐“‰๐’ฝ๐’พ๐“ˆ ๐’พ๐“ƒ ๐’ข๐‘œ๐‘œ๐‘”๐“๐‘’ ๐’ธ๐“๐’ถ๐“ˆ๐“ˆ๐“‡๐‘œ๐‘œ๐“‚? ๐•ณ๐–”๐–œ ๐–†๐–‡๐–”๐–š๐–™ ๐–™๐–๐–Ž๐–˜? You can do either of these with the link I posted above. Again, for many of the same reasons I cite in the first column with respect to emojis, this sort of text can be helpful in many applications. Even if it’s just for adding some flair to keep students engaged, I think it does the trick!

FSymbols

This is another website you can use for emojis and ๐‘“๐‘Ž๐‘›๐‘๐‘ฆ text, as well as old-school keyboard symbols like:

โ˜ป โ™ฅ โ™ฆ โ™ฃ โ™  โ€ข โ—˜ โ—‹ โ—™ โ™ช โ™ซ โ˜ผ โ–บ โ†“ โ†’ โ†

I have so many medical interpreting ethics resources I had to put them in their own tab! Here you’ll find all the ethics resources I have for our classes on ethics.

3.1 – Ethics Parts 1 & 4.1 – Ethics Part 2

[๐Ÿ“•PDF] Medical Interpreting Codes of Ethics & Standards of Practice ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly
A list of all the medical interpreting codes of ethics, standards of practice, and where to find them. I provide links to the pages where the documents can be accessed because these organizations can and do update the link to the PDF version of the document.

[๐Ÿ“‘Google Doc – Read-Only] Comparing COEs: Part 1 ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly (copied/pasted portions from NCIHC, IMIA, CHIA but attributed)
I have a page in this Google Doc for each of the first three ethical principles listed by the NCIHC (for Ethics Part 1). Each page contains a table with three columns, one for NCIHC, IMIA, and CHIA, with excerpts from each code of ethics. Students are encouraged to discuss in breakout rooms how each code of ethics is similar/different in what they say about each ethical principle. Note: I used to do this activity with students having each COE document open, but some students struggled with the technological aspect of switching between documents.

[๐Ÿ“‘Google Doc – Read-Only] Comparing COEs: part 2 ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly (copied/pasted portions from NCIHC, IMIA, CHIA but attributed)
I have a page in this Google Doc for each ethical principle 4-9 listed by the NCIHC (for Ethics Part 2). Each page contains a table with three columns, one for NCIHC, IMIA, and CHIA, with excerpts from each code of ethics. Students are encouraged to discuss in breakout rooms how each code of ethics is similar/different in what they say about each ethical principle. Note: I used to do this activity with students having each COE document open, but some students struggled with the technological aspect of switching between documents.

[โ–ถ๏ธYouTube Video] Ethics Part 1.5: Review of Part 1 Introduction of New Concepts ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly (copied/pasted portions from NCIHC but attributed)
This is a video I typically share as homework between Ethics Part 1 and Ethics Part 2. It reviews some concepts from part 1, but it also briefly introduces the ethical principles in part 2. I also assign a Google Form as homework in which students submit their DOs and DON’Ts for each of the newly-introduced ethical principles (minus advocacy). I then use those form responses in class as points of discussion when we’re going over the ethical principles and standards in more depth in class. I also add these responses to a Google Doc (provided below) that I’ve been compiling since I started teaching Ethics, which students can comment on and I will respond to. Students are also encouraged to download and keep this document for future reference.

[โ–ถ๏ธYouTube Video] Comparing & Contrasting the “Big 3” Medical Interpreting Codes of Ethics (NCIHC, IMIA, & CHIA) ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly (copied/pasted portions from NCIHC, IMIA, & CHIA but attributed)
This is a brief ~15ish minute comparison of what each code of ethics has to say about the ethical principles discussed in class. This is probably my MOST recommended material for ethics since this is a perspective many people don’t even get to examine!

[๐Ÿ“‘Google Doc – Read-Only] Medical Interpreting Ethical Principles DOs and DON’Ts ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly and responses from previous students that she condensed and paraphrased
This document has a section for each NCIHC ethical principle as well as a list of DOs and DON’Ts. I let students know this document is compiled based on their responses, as well as the responses of previous students, and that I do my best to maintain this document. I rarely add new DOs and DON’Ts these days because the list is already quite comprehensive!

[๐Ÿ—ƒ๏ธFlash Cards on Quizlet] NCIHC Standards of Practice ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly (copied/pasted portions from NCIHC but attributed)
Match the standard to its corresponding ethical principle.

[๐Ÿ—ƒ๏ธFlash Cards on Quizlet] Impartiality vs. Role Boundaries ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly (copied/pasted portions from NCIHC but attributed)
Match the description to the corresponding ethical principle (impartiality or role boundaries). After teaching medical interpreting ethics for a while now, I’ve encountered that many students have a difficult time differentiating between the ethical principles of impartiality and maintaining (role) boundaries.

[๐Ÿ”€YouTube Playlist] Medical Interpreting Ethics ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly (see each individual video for further credits)
This is my master medical interpreting ethics playlist. It includes some of the videos listed here, but it also includes others that might be useful!

Again, just like with ethics, I have a lot of materials about BOTH mental health interpreting AND interpreter mental health.

Mental Health Interpreting

[โ–ถ๏ธYouTube Video] The Role of a Mental Health Interpreter: Lecture One ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly for AALB
“Although medical interpreters are often tasked with interpreting in mental/behavioral health settings, the role of the mental health interpreter has some key differences and is complementary to that of the mental healthcare provider. In this course, we compare and contrast the role of the interpreter in medical settings and mental health care settings.” Topics discussed are: affirming & respectful speech (gender-neutral language, person-first language, etc.), tone of voice, interjecting with caution in mental health settings, when clarification is/isn’t necessary in mental health interpreting.

[โ–ถ๏ธYouTube Video] Interpreting in the Mental Health Care System in the USA: Lecture Two ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly for AALB
“In the U.S., interpreters tasked with mental health interpretation will work with many different types of providers and in a variety of settings, some of which may surprise you! Each of these variables has different implications for the interpreter, and some settings may even require special considerations, including paying special attention to safety.” Topics discussed are: the state of mental health care in the U.S., inpatient settings, outpatient settings, intensive outpatient settings, other settings, mental health professionals (titles & training), safety considerations, common misconceptions about patients, knowing how the interpreter can inadvertently impact the mental health encounter, warning signs for outbursts, having a plan for situations in which safety is impacted.

[โ–ถ๏ธYouTube Video] Mental Healthcare Interpreting Techniques: Lecture Three ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly for AALB
“Mental health interpretation requires some techniques medical interpreters may not have in their toolbox. This course delves into the modes of interpretation, how to practice them, and common situations in mental health interpreting, as well as how to navigate them.” Topics discussed are: characteristics of mental health utterances, memory tips (visualization, engage the senses, be ridiculous, chunking, restructuring), how to practice memory retention, RSI limitations for the medical interpreter, if it is possible to remain in consecutive for mental health interpretation, notetaking tips, when to switch from consec to simul, challenging utterances in mental health interpretation.

[โ–ถ๏ธYouTube Video] Mental Health Terminology: Lecture Four ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly for AALB
I start by giving some of my favorite terminology lookup tools and rank them on the most scientific scale ever of: colloquial to technical. Then we jump on in, distinguishing between neurology, psychiatry, and psychology, then moving on to “Brain Basics” in which we discuss the Fight or Flight Response, as well as neurotransmitters and their role in mental health disorders. After that I explain classification systems for mental health disorders (ICD vs. DSM) and use the ICD classifications for the chunk of this 2-hour training to discuss categories and examples of mental health disorders. We also go over how to expand our emotional vocabulary of “feeling” words and go over a BUNCH of mental health acronyms. Of course, I’d be remiss if I didn’t discuss the popular term “trigger” and all its uses. Lastly, I discuss commonly-confused acronyms like ADD & ADHD, as well as SSRI & SNRI.

[๐Ÿ“ŠSurvey Summary] Why Interpreters Need More Mental Health Training ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly
“Unfortunately, mental health interpretation is often lumped in with medical interpretation, and interpreters trained in medical interpretation are usually the ones who are dispatched to interpret for mental health encounters. While medical interpretation and mental health interpretation do share some similarities, they require not only a different set of skills, but the ability to decide when certain skillsets are more appropriate in any given situation.”

[๐Ÿ“ฐArticle] Medical and Mental Health Interpreting: Two Distinct Disciplines ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly
Mental health interpretation is not usually considered a specialty apart, but rather incorporated into medical interpreting as a whole. Many medical interpreters starting out are often blindsided by mental health interpreting assignments with little to no preparation. Most 40-hour medical interpreting training courses do not go over the skills necessary for mental health interpretation. Furthermore, aside from technical interpreting skills, mental health interpreting requires a certain level of emotional intelligence and control, as well as a working knowledge of mental health topics.

[๐Ÿ”€YouTube Playlist] Mental Health Interpreting Practice ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly
Includes one consecutive interpreting practice exercise about interpreting tone of voice, as well as a variety of simultaneous interpreting monologues at different speeds on different patient stories surrounding mental health topics.

[๐Ÿ“ฐArticle] The Use of Voice in Therapy ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Jean Kim M.D. on Psychology Today
Full disclosure: this article contains a term that is now widely considered to be a slur (g*psy). I do briefly discuss this with students and use this as an opportunity to highlight how the usage/perception of terms change over time, and how it is our responsibility to understand these contexts as interpreters. That being said this article is the best resource I’ve found from the perspective of a mental healthcare professional as to how they use their tone of voice for different patients and different mental states.

Interpreter Mental Health Resources

My page on Interpreter Self-Care Resources, which includes a brief description of what self-care actually is because so many people think of this in terms of material things! Lots of great links.

The Interpreter & Translator Peer Support Group page. This is a group I created to focus on the mental health & wellness of linguists. We have a Facebook group but we also meet on Zoom.

Articles & Videos I’ve done re: Interpreter Mental Health

Letโ€™s get real about interpreter mental health with Kelly (Grzech) Henriquez

Interpreter Mental Health: Anxiety & Interpreting (with a special guest!)

Talking About Interpreter Mental Health with Miriam Andrade

I have a bunch of resources that I have listed by class, including videos, Google docs, and more. Not all classes are listed, just the ones I have resources for! Classes are listed chronologically based on how they appear in the schedule. Ethics stuff and mental health interpreting stuff are in previous tabs. I just had SO much.

5.1 – Roles of the Medical Interpreter

[โ–ถ๏ธYouTube Video] Considerations for the Conduit in Medical Interpretation ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly, individual portions of video may provide additional credits
This is a very short clip discussing some finer points of the conduit or message clarifier role in medical interpretation, including the importance of avoiding additions, deletions, and changes in meaning, as well as things we should interpret, including style and tone. This video ties in concepts previously discussed in other classes and brings them into the conversation about interpreter roles.

6.1 – Language Access Laws & Regulations

[โ–ถ๏ธYouTube Video] PHI (Protected Health Information) for Medical Interpreters: What it is and how to protect it ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly
I’ve often encountered that interpreters are not entirely clear what PHI is, let alone examples of PHI in the context of medical interpreting. In this video I expand upon the existing content I cover in the Laws & Regulations class in terms of PHI under HIPAA, but I also add some additional stuff. I spend the majority of this video covering the 18 PHI identifiers in detail, including real-life interpreting examples. I close it out with ways we can, as interpreters, protect PHI. I also discuss how we can de-identify PHI and even briefly discuss paper shredders lol.

[๐Ÿ–ผ๏ธGoogle Drawing – Read-Only] Medical Interpreting PHI Sort ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly and responses from previous students that she condensed and paraphrased
This is a homework assignment I almost always give after Language Access Laws & Regulations, and in it students must drag and drop the pieces of information (related to interpreting) in the margins into the appropriate column. If you’d like to use this with your classes, you are more than welcome to, just “Save A Copy” and then assign it in Google Classroom. I provide the answer key to the assignment in video form after I grade all the responses in classroom.

[โ–ถ๏ธYouTube Video] Is it PHI or Not? For Medical Interpreters ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly
This is a review of the homework activity (Medical Interpreting PHI Sort) I assign as part of a class on language Access Laws & Regulations for medical interpreters. Correct sorting of the answers is shown over the course of the video and explained. I mention in the video that I legitimately don’t care if the students follow my YouTube channel and “cheat” by watching the whole video while completing the assignment. Either way, they have to watch the whole video to do it!

I’ll be adding the rest of this stuff soon!

8.2 – Terminology Management

12.1 – Introduction to Interpreting in Pediatrics

13.2 – Cultural Mediation Scenarios

14.1 – Get Certified! (What is Certification?)

15.1 – Mediums of Interpretation (In-person, VRI, OPI)

15.2 – Business of Medical Interpreting

I’ll be adding more stuff soon!

[๐Ÿ”€YouTube Playlist] Mental Health Interpreting Practice ๐Ÿกณ

๐Ÿ‘คAuthor/Creator: Kelly
Includes one consecutive interpreting practice exercise about interpreting tone of voice, as well as a variety of simultaneous interpreting monologues at different speeds on different patient stories surrounding mental health topics.

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KGH Interpretation Spanish-English Medical & Mental Health Interpretation

Kelly (Grzech) Henriquez

I am a Certified Medical/Healthcare Interpreter (CMI-Spanish, CHI-Spanish) and a medical interpreter trainer. I work as an independent contractor in the greater Richmond, Virginia area as a Spanish-English medical interpreter. Click here to read more about me.

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